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Thread: 1 tonning JK's

  1. #61
    Stickybongsmoking's Avatar
    Stickybongsmoking is offline Yes, this is gawd damn muthafockling CTD NUT.
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    If you are going through the trouble rebuilding and regearing the diff, just put the locker in and been done with it. You are going to have everything apart already. Not much point going through all of the work twice if you know you will be replacing the carrier again.

    Unless you are just going to weld up the open carrier, you are seriously limiting the mobility of your heep by not having a front locker. VERY few parts have as profound an impact on off road performance as a locker.
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    We cut back the cast to access to tube buddy
    ok I get it. now I know.
    Don't ask me cause I don't know.

  3. #63
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    I agree with CTD. Also, i'd run the stock used balljoints, UB's and shafts/joints and check to see if they're worn once complete. But I'm a cheap @ss. lol

    Here's what i did for my cast cut and arm mount on my 86-91 to get as much room as possible to prevent tire scrub on full crank. Mind you i'm running straight arms and H2's that have 5.5" back spacing. Less room then the 77.5-79 flavour but more room then yours. Anyway, just tossing some idea's out there.


    I cut the cast at the same angle as my truss so i could weld it up and leave as much as possible. Kind of a shit pic but you can see it.



    Mount tight as possible to the chunk









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    Drilled a hole in the web and added a bolt for extra strength? haha
    2012 JKU Sahara, SD HP60 Front, GM 14 Bolt shaved rear, 5.38s, locked/Spooled, 4 link front 3 link rear, Oris, TR Double Beadlocks, 42" tsl sx2, PSC Full Hydro, D3 bumpers, D3 skids, D3 Rock Rails, D3 Cage, and lots more...
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  5. #65
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    Yes sir. lol. And yours has tons of webbing! lol

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    mine has a 2" thick cast steel mount for ford radius arms! retarded! borrowing a generator welder and gouger from work to slice it apart in literally 2 min haha two big slices and bam its stipped and just gotta grind way better then heating the crap out of it with torch and trying to cut it all off (tried it already it sucks) It is deffinatly very labour intensive though

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    im defiantly interested to see what the amm 11.5 turns out like, i have been toying with the idea of getting one for my build.
    91 Renagade
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  8. #68
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    1 tonning JK's

    Sorry haven't posted in a while just gathering parts and such! I'll get back on the topic soon!


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    yep, keep the updates coming!
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  10. #70
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    here is some data on the front end! I know i have been slacking just been busy with everything project has been on hold!

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    here is some info off Pirate for pinion depth and backlash for you home garage gear heads!!

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    Backlash
    Definition: The amount by which a tooth space exceeds the thickness of an engaging tooth.
    Think of it as: Play between the mating teeth of gears or how tightly the ring and pinion gears mesh together.
    How Measured: Measured as the free movement of the ring-gear with pinion held steady, in thousandths of an inch, using a dial indicator on the ring-gear. In other words, you’re measuring how much you can rotate the ring-gear before it engages the pinion teeth – this is the space between the teeth – called “backlash.”
    Adjusted Via: Carrier shims. Adding shims on the ring-gear side of the carrier moves the ring-gear closer to the pinion, causing the teeth to mesh more closely, decreasing the amount the ring-gear can rock without turning the pinion, and therefore decreasing the backlash. Adding shims on the non ring-gear side moves the ring-gear away from the pinion, increasing backlash. Note that: carrier shims added to one side must be subtracted from the other, and vice versa, to maintain a consistent carrier pre-load.
    Note: Backlash changes about 0.007” for every 0.010” the carrier is moved. The purpose of having backlash (i.e. the reason gears aren’t set-up tight, with no play) is to prevent the gears from jamming together. Lack of backlash may cause noise, overloading, overheating, or seizing and failure of the gears or bearings.



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    Pinion Depth
    Definition: Position of pinion-gear relative to the ring-gear centreline, expressed as either a mounting distance (measured from behind the pinion head to the centreline of the ring-gear) or a checking distance (measured from the face of the pinion head to the centreline of the ring-gear).
    Think of it as: How close the head of the pinion is to the centreline of the ring-gear. Proper pinion depth makes sure the pinion teeth mesh with the middle of the teeth on the ring-gear – between the top and the root. Increasing pinion depth moves the pinion closer to the centreline of the ring-gear, moving the pinion “deeper” into ring-gear teeth and reducing the checking distance.
    How Measured: The final determination of correct pinion depth can only be obtained by reading and interpreting the gear tooth contact pattern using gear-marking compound. There exist specialized tools for measuring pinion depth, but they are expensive, aren’t necessary, and are only used to calculate a starting point – final proof always lies in the contact pattern.
    Adjusted Via: Inner pinion shims placed between the housing and the inner pinion-bearing cup. Adding shims moves pinion closer to ring-gear centreline, moving the pattern from the top to the root. Removing shims moves pinion further away from ring-gear centreline, moving the pattern from the root to the top.
    Note: When adjusting pinion depth, begin with a starting shim stack and make large adjustments at first (10-20 thou) until the correct setting is bracketed; then make progressively smaller adjustments until the final setting is achieved. Adding or subtracting a single shim of one thou can, and does, make a difference. Increasing pinion depth also decreases backlash and moves drive pattern slightly towards toe, and coast pattern slightly towards the heel. Decreasing pinion depth also increases backlash and moves the drive pattern slightly towards the heel, and the coast pattern slightly towards the toe. Increasing pinion depth will also increase pinion-bearing preload unless the outer pinion shims are adjusted.

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    here is a comparison for a stock JK calliper to a stock one ton calliper

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  12. #72
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    For steering I chose for my build to run Weaver Fab high steer just waiting for the parts to arrive this week!

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    2005-2008 HI-STEER KIT (SINGLE SIDE)


    $275.00


    Now available is our hi-steer kit for 2005 & up Ford SuperDuty F250-F350 Axles.
    CNC Machined Knuckles
    Hi-Carbon Dowels
    Keyed 1″ Thick Steering Arms
    5 Bolt 180,000 PSI Attachment
    All hardware included.

    * Allows factory vacuum hub locks to remain operational if desired.

    All Products And Fasteners Are Made In The USA.

  13. #73
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    Still deciding on other parts and waiting for stuff from laser cut for my mounts and such... more updates to come

  14. #74
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    Awesome thread!
    OF4WD member #7498

  15. #75
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    Curious what brake master cylinder are you planning on running?
    Poster does not represent or warrant the the information accessible via this post is accurate or complete. Except as specifically stated on this post, neither rbjeepthing nor any of his affiliates, will be liable for damages arising out of or in connection with the use of this post.

  16. #76
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    1 tonning JK's

    Probably a ram one some guys just put up with factory spongy feel some run teraflex big booster which is basically a ram one so prolly toss one on see how we like that and go from there


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  17. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by just-lift-it View Post
    Probably a ram one some guys just put up with factory spongy feel some run teraflex big booster which is basically a ram one so prolly toss one on see how we like that and go from there

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    Last one we did we used a Ram 2500 one worked quite well. Res hit the hood so some clearencing was required.

  18. #78
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    1 tonning JK's

    Clearance is no issue grind away on them hahaha thanks man


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    given my career choice and background i love to get into the techincal aspects and engineering of components and why one is superior over another and so on... I have been reading and calling around getting info on axle shafts and gear sets for these builds! We decided to stay on factory shafts until we break because we want to see what a stock 35 spline will take vs a stock 30 spline and so on... this is our own personal choice to seeing first hand because we want to see it fail....

    But when they do fail and it comes to upgrade I dont want to just go buy Yukon shafts because buddy says there good... are they good because they market the most? been around the longest? have the best name? or do they actually use north american material? with quality processes? this is the info I go after I have actaully been hung up on by a few manufactures when calling around trying to find anwsers to my techinical questions about thier manufacturing process which amuses me very much haha

    Same with ring and pinions... everyone says oh just buy yukon and be done, really? why? because of their name? I wish there were more technical people to have these convos with but most just buy whats available and highly used with no care... from what I have found from online and calling every manufacture uses 8620 tool steel which is then cnc machines (obviously yout think someone will sit there turning knobs these days) I dont even know why they bother saying cnc its 2015!!! congrats for marketing haha and they are all computer controlled heat treated after... You research enough and call enough people and it comes down to everyone in a round about way saying the same thing, there roughly 5-8 manufacturing facilities over sea that make hypoid gear sets for differentials, these manufacturing facilities then sell to companies like Dana, Spicer, Richmond, Yukon, Motive, Nitro, USA Alloy.... these companys have their own engineering staff and their own quality standards so they pick and choose what gear set they grab from said factory over seas and toss them in thier own fancy box. So if everyone uses 8620 steel, they all come from the same place, there all going through the same heat treatment, but they have different standards per company it becomes very difficult to make your choice...

    What would you choose for such a thing? what you buddy bought and had good results with? what the well known 4x4 shop carries in stock and wants to sell you? dont care? what one comes in the best bost? or what one comes with decals and has a bad ass marketing team? whats your opinion on the matter fellow jeepkings members!

    Anyways! for those of you on here who like understanding things and knowing what your actually buying for fact and not for opinion here is good read on axle shaft technology!!


    Axle Tech
    .





    What axle material do you use? What makes your axles stronger than stock? Why induction hardening vs thru hardening? Why are your axles machined after heat treating? These are just a few of the questions we address every day at Dutchman.


    Heat Treat:
    Induction hardening is the process by which an axle shaft is passed thru an electrical coil, which heats the steel red hot and then quenches the steel to make it hard. The amount of heat put into the steel determines the case depth-the hotter and slower the scan, the deeper and harder the case hardening. The deeper the case, the stronger the shaft. Most stock (oem) shafts made from 1039 steel have a case depth of .125 - .150, and have a hardness of 50-54 on the Rockwell "C" scale. The Dutchman 1541-H shafts have a case depth around the .300 mark and a hardness of 56-59 Rockwell "C" scale. This combo is what gives a 25-30% strength increase over stock 1039 shafts-if you are comparing shafts with a similar length and spline count. Thru hardening is a process by which an axle shaft is heated in a furnace resulting in a shaft that has the same heat treat from the center to the outside diameter. Thru hardened axles have a hardness of 46-48 on the Rockwell "C" scale. The hard case/soft core of an induction hardened 1541-H shaft yields its torsional strength & ductility and the softer "thru Hardening" of a 4340 shaft yields its torsional strength & ductility.

    Axle Materials:
    Most stock (oem) axles are made from 1039 steel-in the world of press on bearing type axle shafts, and 1050 steel-in the world of c-clip type axle shafts. The 1050 material has more carbon than the 1039 and is needed on the c-clip design to achieve a harder surface where the needle style bearing runs on the axle.
    The factory (oem) is only interested in functional, non-performance, in-expensive axle shafts and keeps costs down by using economical materials and quick manufacturing methods such as; rolling the splines and induction hardening the shafts with a quick scan of the shaft, resulting in a shaft that is intended for non-performance driving to and from work, the store, or wherever.

    The Dutchman line of flanged alloy axles are made from 1541-H material. 1541-H contains 1.5-2 percent manganese, which allows for a deeper case hardening and tighter grain structure-which ultimately makes for a "stronger than stock" axle shaft. In our line of performance front axles shafts, we use the 4340 "Chromoly" material which is thru hardenable. The design of the shaft and U-Joint ears necessitates the thru hardening process as it is not practical to induction harden the ears.

    4340 vs. 1541-H. 4340 has more tensile strength than 1541-H, will take more twisting forces, but cannot take bending forces as well as 1541-H. Flanged axles are overhung beyond the wheel bearing and are subject to these bending forces-especially in the world of wider and/or larger diameter tires. The hard case and soft core design of a 1541-H flanged axle enable the shaft to bend, flex, and spring back. Properly executed, both 4340 "thru hardened" and an upgraded 1541-H "induction hardened" shaft can achieve nearly the same results in strength in the area of torsional strength (twist forces), but the design of an induction hardened shaft usually yields more bending (life) cycles than a thru hardened 4340 shaft. 4340 is more expensive than 1541-H, thus is reserved for the front shafts only which need the heat treated U-Joint ears for strength reasons.

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    another pointless but cool pic to compare king pin 60 to newer balljoint 60

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