Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Flipping axles or running them backwards?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    London, Ontario
    Posts
    3,004
    Time Online: 1 Mth 2 Wks 3 Days 15 Hrs 42 Mins 42 Secs
    Avg. Time Online: 3 Mins 55 Secs
    Rep Power
    18

    Flipping axles or running them backwards?

    I just scored an offroad 4x4 forklift. It has a 48 inch ag type tires, but unlike cars, the rear axles steer. To put this monster axle in a truck I would need it to be going backwards all the time. Wild that be hard for a differential? I think the oiling would not be the best. Would the pinion or other gear wear faster going in reverse all the time?
    Want to see the future, past or the unknown? Learn to be psychic. Ask me how!
    A good time to invest in spf3000 if you live on the NK penninsula.
    Oh November 17, how I fear thee...

  2. #2
    Stickybongsmoking's Avatar
    Stickybongsmoking is offline Yes, this is gawd damn muthafockling CTD NUT.
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Caistor Centre - Cultural Hub of the universe
    Posts
    4,933
    My Mood
    Buzzed
    Time Online: 10 Mths 3 Wks 5 Days 42 Mins 45 Secs
    Avg. Time Online: 26 Mins 53 Secs
    Rep Power
    28
    Just out of curiosity, do you know for a fact that the rotation direction of the pinions on these axles is the same or different than what you need? It is very possible they could be turning in the opposite direction now swapping them front to rear will make them then turn in the correct direction. There is no standard for the rotation direction for these things across the entire heavy equipment industry.

    You really need to specify what type of axles you are dealing with. If they have hypoid helical cut gears, running them backwards means they will be running on the coast side which will make for a weaker configuration. How much weaker depends on a few factors including the hypoid offset and the cut of the gears.

    Oiling is another issue altogether. Some axles lend themselves much better than others to have modified oiling for flipping the housing.

    Also, you may have to cut and rotate knuckles, etc, if the axle is upside down. And are these planetaries? A lot of heavy off road equipment uses them. This may make them have way too low of an overall gear ratio to be useful for recreational wheeling depending on your tire size and how you use the vehicle.
    A Member of:
    New Frontier 4x4 Club
    OF4WD 4928 & 6687


    1980 CJ Juggy
    2004 GC 4.7 HO Overland

    "Simple, yet functional....like a Sledgehammer"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    London, Ontario
    Posts
    3,004
    Time Online: 1 Mth 2 Wks 3 Days 15 Hrs 42 Mins 42 Secs
    Avg. Time Online: 3 Mins 55 Secs
    Rep Power
    18
    The rear axle is steering axle so that needs to go to the front. Basically Like running this beast backwards all the time. It is a International Hough 50 loader. Looks to be a C model with planetary gears other hubs.

  4. #4
    Stickybongsmoking's Avatar
    Stickybongsmoking is offline Yes, this is gawd damn muthafockling CTD NUT.
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Caistor Centre - Cultural Hub of the universe
    Posts
    4,933
    My Mood
    Buzzed
    Time Online: 10 Mths 3 Wks 5 Days 42 Mins 45 Secs
    Avg. Time Online: 26 Mins 53 Secs
    Rep Power
    28
    some interesting facts - The Hough H50 had a production run from 1959-1977. In the payloader configuration, it was the largest rigid frame model offered at the time.

    Axle info appears to be extremely limited. It appears as though they could have been Hough's own in-house manufactured planetaries. Parts and service look to be nearly non-existent. That said, I did come across a company listing part numbers for almost all of the H50 axle parts.
    I have no idea if that means they have any stock of them, though. https://www.lesmachineriesst-amant.c...anetary-parts/

    Also, what type of brakes does it have? It looks like there could be different set ups? Some info was stating they were air. That may have meant they could have been air over hydraulic. Could have been straight hydraulic, too. The only wheel cylinder info I saw was hydraulic which leads me to believe that. Either way, those big ass drums look like a nightmare. I would consider retrofitting some modern braking on there...which may, or may not be realistic based on the size of those planet hubs.

    All I see is opening a big can of worms on axles that may not realistically be serviceable. And if they are, I would be very concerned about the costs and/or parts availability.

    Those axles are going to be stupid heavy and have a significant gear reduction far beyond what an automotive application would be have. I would expect something in the neighbourhood of 20:1...it could even be more...who knows? Not very practical for most wheel combos and tire sizes. And we really don't even know if these axles were all that great, either.

    Without having any idea what your plans are for them, I'd stay away.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •